Hypertension in pregnancy

Hypertension in pregnancy is a condition characterized by high blood pressure during pregnancy. It is a common complication that can affect both the mother and the baby. There are several types of hypertension that can occur during pregnancy:

  1. Gestational hypertension: This type of hypertension develops after 20 weeks of pregnancy and typically resolves after delivery. It is characterized by high blood pressure without the presence of protein in the urine or other signs of preeclampsia.
  2. Preeclampsia: Preeclampsia is a serious condition characterized by high blood pressure and signs of damage to other organ systems, such as the kidneys or liver. It can occur after 20 weeks of pregnancy and is often associated with protein in the urine (proteinuria). Preeclampsia can lead to complications for both the mother and the baby if not managed properly.
  3. Chronic hypertension: Chronic hypertension is high blood pressure that was present before pregnancy or that develops before 20 weeks of pregnancy. Women with chronic hypertension may be at an increased risk of developing preeclampsia or other complications during pregnancy.
  4. Preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension: Some women with pre-existing chronic hypertension may develop superimposed preeclampsia during pregnancy, which can worsen the condition and increase the risk of complications.

Hypertension in pregnancy requires careful monitoring and management to reduce the risk of complications for both the mother and the baby. Treatment may include medication to lower blood pressure, lifestyle changes, and close monitoring of both the mother and the baby’s health. In severe cases, early delivery of the baby may be necessary to prevent further complications. Regular prenatal care is essential for early detection and management of hypertension in pregnancy.

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